Edition 21 – Wealth Is Not A Dirty Word

We have a lot to be grateful for living in Australia.

We have spirit of freedom and independence that was won through peace, not war.

We live in a safe country where our stance on issues such as gun law reform are world leading.

We experience a climate that most others around the world only dream of.

However, what I really, really don’t like about Australia is the Tall Poppy Syndrome.

And, I’m concerned that, at the moment, any reference to wealth in Australia is being subjected to the Tall Poppy Syndrome.

Let me explain.

Some of the political debate at the moment is coalescing around the following (flawed) arguments:

  1. People that are on (perceived) high levels of income are considered wealthy.
  2. People that are in business are considered wealthy.
  3. People that own investment properties are considered wealthy.
  4. People that have reasonable sized superannuation balances are considered wealthy.

The national narrative is formulating around each of these groups and how much more they should be contributing to our nation. In essence, these are the people that are being penalised for their perceived level of wealth.

Here’s my words of advice.

  1. Wealth creates prosperity.
  2. Prosperity creates a nation where everyone shares in the spoils.
  3. Wealth builds revenues for governments, which enables them to fund the programmes they stand for and believe will build a better Australia.
  4. People with wealth are not taking away. Most of them are not drawing anything from the Government.
  5. Wealth creates stronger families, stronger communities and a stronger Australia.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with being wealthy.

There is nothing wrong with creating wealth. Creating wealth is aspirational.

I’ve not heard of too many people aspiring to drive a 30 year old, oil leaking rust bucket.

But I have heard of people that would like to build an independent financial foundation for themselves and their families.

And I’ve heard of people that would like to generate wealth so they can make choices with that wealth. Whether it is to donate to charities, support their families (immediate and extended) or buy nice cars, the desire is there.

Desiring wealth is not dirty — it is a means of self-reliance. Never having to rely on anyone. Or any Government.

The degree to which you desire wealth doesn’t matter. Just the desire to be wealthy.

My hope is the tone and nature of the national conversation changes.

That we encourage the creation of wealth. Applaud it. Celebrate it.

For everyone will be the winner in a wealthy Australia.


This Week’s Tip

Building wealth leads to financial independence and the ability to make choices. Who doesn’t want the ability to make choices?

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